Eskom worker bitten by stiletto snake

Paramedics busy tending to the Eskom worker after he was bitten by a snake.

The snake managed to bite the worker on his right hand index finger, through his glove, whilst he was busy working.

Fellow workers managed to take a photo of the snake before it disappeared between rocks.

 

A picture of the snake, taken by fellow workers, after the man was bitten.

 

Arthur Roden, of the National Council of South African Reptile Rescue Units (NSARRU) was called to the scene by Life24 EMRS paramedics to help identify the snake.

Read: Massive snake in pool

Although it was difficult to identify the snake from the photo, the man’s symptoms indicated that it was a stiletto snake.

Charl Blake, of Life24, said the man complained of severe pain, a stiff neck and dry throat.

 

The wound where the man was bitten on his index finger.

 

The stiletto snake has horizontal fangs pointing diagonally towards the corners of the mouth.

The snake usually hunts underground by simply protruding its fangs when it is next to its prey, to stab it.

VIDEO: Snake jumps up and almost bite biker

There is no antivenom for a stiletto snake bite and patients have to be treated symptomatically. If bitten on the hand as in this case, the bite can result in the patient losing fingers.

The patient was rushed to the Life Cosmos Hospital in eMalahleni for treatment. He was discharged two days later.

 

Other news:

Railway track thieves ambushed by police

Video: ‘Shebeen skelms’ – women trawl shebeens to target luxury car owners

Video: Trucks collide in Samora Machel Street

Black magic muti makes R20 000 dissappear

(Graphic content) Body found next to river with arm torn off

Super Sport United team stuck on N4 after convoy crash

Want breaking news on the go?

Add us on WhatsApp. Save the Middelburg Observer standby number 072 248 3855 on your phone and send a WhatsApp message with the words “Add me” to receive news links.

  AUTHOR
Jana Boshoff
Journalist

Latest News

COMMENTS

Top
Next Story x
Severe weather conditions the new norm